Who’s not on internet & why not?

Travelling around the net and its inter-pipes as we do, we tend now to take it all for granted. Even the colloquia defines its omnipresence.

But recently when I emailed a link to a friend to subscribe to my blog, she replied.  “I need to research how to do that”

My thought was “Oh dear, how often we take so much for granted”

As we live in a busy business world it seems we are totally dominated by the digital presence not even a decade old. The truth is, for many “The Internet” is  barely understood and is used only in limited ways.

Certainly no one asks what the internet is anymore. But unlike the telephone and television that is all pervasive and taken for granted, it still has a long way to go.

When I investigated global per capita internet usage I found some interesting data. Globally penetration rates on a world average are  23.8% Top of the list at 74% is the Nth Americas followed by Australia / Oceania at 60% then Europe  at 49%. Elsewhere the take-up averages less than 30%

According to Internet Word Stats Mar 31 2009 data world Internet penetration rates by geographical region were:

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By far the largest internet users are Asia with 41% of the total world’s users. Yet the penetration rate there is only 17% of a total region 3.8 billion population.

Here is the raw data :

Regions

Population 2008

Users 2000

Users  2009

Penetration %

Growth %

Users %

Africa

975.3

4.5

54.2

5.6%

1100%

3.4%

Asia

3,780.8

114.3

657.2

17.4%

475%

41.2%

Europe

803.9

105.1

393.4

48.9%

274%

24.6%

Middle East

196.8

3.3

45.9

23.3%

1296%

2.9%

NTH America

337.6

108.1

251.3

74.4%

133%

15.7%

Latin America

581.2

18.1

173.6

29.9%

861%

10.9%

Oceania/Aus

34.4

7.6

20.8

60.4%

173%

1.3%

WORLD

6,710.0

361.0

1,596.3

23.8%

342%

100.0%

On a more granular basis a further breakdown of emerging China, India and Indonesia take-ups may compare at even lower levels when more developed Asian nations are excluded.

But the most interesting number is the high trending in the lower penetration regions that have large populations. This shows they are fast catching the mature regions where growth is much slower.

When I looked back on my friend to see if this answered why she may be having trouble I needed to look in more detail at more developed communities. I found An Oxford Internet Institute survey darted July 2006 that gave me some clues. It reported its findings on internet access, use and attitudes in Britain at that time. It  noted then that digital divides continued to exist in the British users surveyed.

Their survey also showed:

  • 17 per cent of users maintain an online social networking profile
  • 85 per cent of users use a broadband connection for home access
  • 33% of students met someone online
  • 13% met offline someone they first met online
  • 93 % send emails
  • 60 % use instant messaging
  • 72 % believe that the internet to be addictive

One observation was ex-users are most likely to have stopped going online due to a lack of interest and access, but a telling clue was non-users cited “lack of skill” as the limiter

3 thoughts on “Who’s not on internet & why not?

  1. @Dianne

    Dianne, yes talking about skill all I can say is “me too” and if practice makes perfect you have to be fast before it all changes again.
    My good friend Beth Wilde who was the real live person I took licence from in my post is actually an expert too and she complains about the pace of change.

    But what about knowledge? On reading your blog i did not know there was so much to know about the foot.

    What a great resource you have there.

    Rsgards
    Gordon

  2. Lack of skill is it Gordon. I have developed skills over the pasy few years but there is still so much more I could do if I had more time to learn the skills. I know what the skills are, and I have access to them, but the time is – just not there. Yet, I am still doing much more than I was 3 years ago. And I still feel at a standstill however. So, I think you are right.

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